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Fox replaces Pam Oliver with Erin Andrews

July 17, 2014

 

LAWT Wire Services 

 

Hints of racism began to circulate when word spread that 20-year veteran Pam Oliver will be replaced her spot to Erin Andrews, whom the network hired away... Read more...

District Attorney says training is key to diversion programs

July 17, 2014

 

City News Service

 

Training law enforcement officers, prosecutors, judges and other members of the criminal justice system to recognize mental illness is critical to breaking... Read more...

Phi Beta Sigma announces 2014 Centennial Week activities July 16-20

July 17, 2014

 

LAWT NEWS SERVICE

 

WASHINGTON—Jonathan A. Mason, International President of Phi Beta Sigma, one of the country’s largest African American men’s organizations,... Read more...

‘Extant’ premiere, CBS top television ratings

July 17, 2014

 

By STEVEN HERBERT

City News Service

 

The CBS drama “Extant,” starring Halle Berry, drew the largest audience for a series premiere this summer and was last week’s... Read more...

Supervisor Mark Ridley-Thomas approves reward for Compton killer

July 17, 2014

 

City News Service 

The Board of Supervisors approved a $10,000 reward in hopes of tracking down the killer of a 23-year-old man gunned down last year in Compton in broad daylight.

 

David... Read more...

October 03, 2013

By Jennifer Bihm

LAWT Staff Writer

 

“If this makes you angry, that’s because it should. This behavior from some Republicans in Con­gress is as irresponsible as it gets,” said Jon Carson, a spokes­person for President Barack Obama.

“These aren’t just games. Speaker Boehner is letting one faction of one party in one chamber of Congress sabotage our economy. They shut down the government, and now some of them are ready to push us past the brink by refusing to do something every American does — pay their bills…”

Carson’s statement echoes that of many politicians and community leaders weighing in on the government shutdown, which began October 1 over a disagreement between the Democratic-controlled Senate and the Republican-controlled House over the recently passed Affordable Care Act.

“Today is a sad day not just for hundreds of thousands of government workers, many of whom live paycheck-to-paycheck, but for our veterans, senior citizens, and average hardworking Americans,” said Congresswoman Janice Hahn.

“The Republicans have decided that their obsession with the Affordable Care Act is more important than the rest of the government—more important than paying FBI agents, more important than keeping the Wall Street watchdogs on the job, more important than keeping the lights on at the Environmental Protection Agency, more important than researching a cure for cancer, and more important than indefinitely furloughing, without pay, 800,000 of our fellow Americans.

 “I’d say I believe that the suffering caused by a shutdown will be enough to change my Republican friends’ minds, but this is the same group of people who proudly voted to slash food stamps by 40 billion dollars when nearly 47 million Americans are still struggling to feed themselves without help. I am deeply disappointed that our nation has been forced into a government shutdown. There’s no reason for us to be at this point. I hope the Republicans will listen to the American people and allow us to vote on a clean bill to end the shutdown immediately.”

About 800,000 government employees deemed “non essential” were furloughed as of October 1, being put on indefinite unpaid leave and according to news re­ports, the Capitol was a “ghost town, run by a skeleton crew.” Also, government entities like Centers for Disease Control and the Con­sumer Product Safety Com­mission could not function. How­ever, the United States Department of Veterans Affairs and Social Security Administration, which are funded by long-term or mandatory appropriations, were largely unaffected.

“The irresponsibility of the Republican Party cannot be overstated,” said Congresswoman Maxine Waters on Tuesday.

“As we slowly emerge from the worst economic crisis in over 70 years, I am saddened that ideological extremism has led to another self-inflicted wound that could have dire consequences for our fragile recovery. Even a short shutdown threatens job creation, harms small businesses, and leaves families with uncertainty and instability. Some agencies will be forced to drain reserve funds, while others will close entirely. The SBA will stop approving loans and loan guarantees for small businesses. Housing loans to low and middle income families in rural communities will be put on hold, as will start-up business loans for farmers and ranchers. This will not only harm those seeking these loans, but the small banks that offer them, slowing business and leading to potentially large backlogs.

“Republicans are gambling with the American economy to make an ideological point. Each day this shutdown continues risks further irreparable damage to our financial system, our economy and our middle class. It must end now.”

Meanwhile, Congresswoman Karen Bass was offering answers to frequently asked questions about the shutdown like, “how will my benefits be affected,” on her website.

Parent Category: ROOT
Category: News

October 03, 2013

By David Stokes

Special to the NNPA from The Atlanta Inquirer

 

Evelyn Gibson Lowery, a civil rights activist and wife of Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) co-founder Joseph E. Lowery, died in her southwest Atlanta home Thursday morning from complications from a stroke. She was 88 years old.

The founder and board chair of SCLC/WOMEN (Women’s Organizational Movement for Equality Now), Inc. was admitted to a local hospital Sept. 18. She was discharged Wednesday after physician concluded there was nothing else they could do to preserve her life. Joseph Lowery, who turns 92 on Oct. 6, said in a statement, “My beloved Evelyn was a special woman whose life was committed to service, especially around issues of empowering women.  She was a wonderful mother and wife, and I thank God that she didn’t suffer any pain, and that I was blessed having her as my partner, my confidante and my best friend for close to 70 years.”

He continued, “I will miss her each and every day, but as a man of faith, I know that she is with her God.  My entire family has been overwhelmed by the continuous outpourings of love, support and prayers that have come from across the country, and we ask for your continued prayers over the next few days.”

For more than 50 years, Mrs. Lowery assisted in advancing the cause of women, the African-American family unit, as well as people, in general. She was a regular fixture at the side of her husband during the Civil Rights Movement, beginning with the  Montgomery, Ala. bus boycott.

But Mrs. Lowery carved out her niche in the ’50s, ’60s and ’70s as she  championed women’s rights within the movement as well as worked with her husband with the Atlanta-based Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC).

Among her signature achievements were creation of SCLC/WOMEN’s annual “Drum Major for Justice” awards dinner, held every April 4, the anniversary of the death of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. The awards, established in 1980, recognize individuals advancing justice, equality and peace.

Another landmark achievement was the Evelyn Gibson Lowery African-American Civil Rights Heritage Tour, held the first weekend in every March. Mrs. Lowery served as a guide to students touring major civil rights sites in Alabama.

Funeral arrangements were pending at press time. The family asks that contributions in Mrs. Lowery’s name be sent to SCLC/WOMEN, Inc., 328 Auburn Avenue, N.E. Atlanta, Ga., 30312.

Some of the donations will go toward the group’s upcoming event, Pampering For Peace, an activity to support women in local domestic violence shelters.

Although her husband, Joseph, retired in January 1998 as the longest serving president of SCLC, Mrs. Lowery wasn’t ready to retreat from public life.

“There is much more to be accomplished; so many successes have taken place over the years, yet, so many more are still coming,” she said 15 years ago. “We must remain on course, stand and work vigilantly, and witness the rewards of our labor for the cause of freedom, justice and peace.”

Mrs. Lowery was the mother of three daughters: Yvonne, Karen, Cheryl as well as a loving grandmother and great-grandmother — and friend to all who supported and worked for the cause of peace, justice and equality.

 

Parent Category: ROOT
Category: News

October 03, 2013

Special to the NNPA from The Washington Informer

 

Lee Thornton, a former CNN and CBS correspondent and the interim dean for the University of Maryland’s journalism school, died Sept. 25 after a brief illness. She was 71.

Thorton had been battling pancreatic cancer, journalism website Mediabistro reported.

Thornton began with CBS in New York in 1974 before moving to Washington, where she worked with esteemed journalists Lesley Stahl and Ed Bradley. As the White House correspondent was the first African-American woman to regularly cover that beat for a major news network.

In 1982, she moved to NPR, becoming the first black woman to host the weekend edition of “All Things Considered.” She later returned to television, joining CNN in 1992.

Thornton joined the Philip Merrill College of Journalism at the University of Maryland in 1997. She also produced several programs for the college, including “Front & Center,” an award-winning series of in-depth interviews with fellow journalists.

 

Parent Category: ROOT
Category: News

October 03, 2013

By George E. Curry

NNPA Editor-in-Chief

 

WASHINGTON (NNPA) – Although the shutdown of the federal government that began  Tuesday is affecting all Americans, a disproportionate portion of the 800,000 furloughed federal workers are African Americans, according to the U.S. Office of Personnel Manage­ment.

Because government jobs have been more available to Blacks than private sector employment over the years, especially under de jure segregation, Blacks, who comprise 13.6 percent of the U.S. population, make up 17.7 percent of the federal workforce.

Overall, people of color represent 34 percent of the federal workforce. Latinos are 8 percent of government workers, Asians are 5.8 percent, Native Americans are 2.1 percent and Native Hawaiian and other Pacific Islanders are .40 percent of federal employees. People of color are 37 percent of the U.S. population, a figure projected to grow to 43.3 percent as soon as 2025 and 57 percent by 2060.

Federal workers considered non-essential to the functioning of government were instructed not to report for work as of Tuesday, the first day of the new fiscal year, because Congress failed to pass a permanent or interim budget in time to prevent a federal shutdown, the first in nearly two decades.

The impasse came as a result of a Republican-controlled House determination to tie any budget measure to defunding the Afford­able Care Act, the major provisions of which went into effect Tuesday.

On Monday, President Obama warned about the consequences of a federal shutdown.

“With regard to operations that will continue:  If you’re on Social Security, you will keep receiving your checks.  If you’re on Medicare, your doctor will still see you.  Everyone’s mail will still be delivered.  And government operations related to national security or public safety will go on.  Our troops will continue to serve with skill, honor, and courage.  Air traffic controllers, prison guards, those who are with border control — our Border Patrol will remain on their posts, but their paychecks will be delayed until the government reopens.  NASA will shut down almost entirely, but Mission Control will remain open to support the astronauts serving on the Space Station.”

Obama added, “I also want to be very clear about what would change.  Office buildings would close.  Paychecks would be delayed.  Vital services that seniors and veterans, women and children, businesses and our economy depend on would be hamstrung.  Business owners would see delays in raising capital, seeking infrastructure permits, or rebuilding after Hurricane Sandy.  Veterans who’ve sacrificed for their country will find their support centers unstaffed.  Tourists will find every one of America’s national parks and monuments, from Yosemite to the Smithsonian to the Statue of Liberty, immediately closed.  And of course, the communities and small businesses that rely on these national treasures for their livelihoods will be out of customers and out of luck.

“And in keeping with the broad ramifications of a shutdown, I think it’s important that everybody understand the federal government is America’s largest employer.  More than 2 million civilian workers and 1.4 million active-duty military serve in all 50 states and all around the world.  In the event of a government shutdown, hundreds of thousands of these dedicated public servants who stay on the job will do so without pay — and several hundred thousand more will be immediately and indefinitely furloughed without pay.”

The shutdown could have dire consequences for our national security, according to a report by the Congressional Research Service.

According to the report, “Shut­down of the Federal Government: Causes, Processes, and Effects,” published Sept. 23: “A federal government shutdown could have possible negative security implications as some entities wishing to take actions harmful to U.S. interests may see the nation as physically and politically vulnerable,” the report stated.

If the past is any guide, the shutdown might be short-lived. The longest federal shutdown lasted 21 days, from Dec. 16, 1995 to Jan. 6, 1996. In the past, furloughed federal workers received retroactive pay for the time they were out. But there is no assurance that would happen this time. Members of Congress are exempt from furloughs.

There is also concern that the shutdown will be another setback for the already shaky economy.

Moddy’s Analytics estimates that a three to four week shutdown could cost the economy about $55 billion, about equal the combined economic disruption caused by Hurricane Katrina and Superstorm Sandy.

When the government was shutdown in fiscal year 1996, according to the Congressional Research Service report:

Health –  New patients were not accepted into clinical research at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) clinical center; the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention ceased disease surveillance; and hotline calls to NIH concerning diseases were not answered.

Law Enforcement and Public Safety – Delays occurred in the processing of alcohol, tobacco, firearms, and explosives applications by the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms; work on more than 3,500 bankruptcy cases reportedly was suspended; cancellation of the recruitment and testing of federal law enforcement officials reportedly occurred, including the hiring of 400 border patrol agents; and delinquent child-support cases were delayed.

Parks, Museums, and Mon­uments. Closure of 368 National Park Service sites (loss of 7 million visitors) reportedly occurred, with loss of tourism revenues to local communities; and closure of national museums and monuments (reportedly with an estimated loss of 2 million visitors) occurred.

Visas and Passports – Approx­imately 20,000-30,000 applications by foreigners for visas reportedly went unprocessed each day; 200,000 U.S. applications for passports reportedly went unprocessed; and U.S. tourist industries and airlines reportedly sustained millions of dollars in losses.

American Veterans – Multiple services were curtailed, ranging from health and welfare to finance and travel.

Federal Contractors – Of $18 billion in Washington, D.C.-area contracts, $3.7 billion (more than 20 percent) reportedly were affected adversely by the funding lapse; the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) was unable to issue a new standard for lights and lamps that was scheduled to be effective January 1, 1996, possibly resulting in delayed product delivery and lost sales; and employees of federal contractors reportedly were furloughed without pay.

Speaking in the Rose Garden Tuesday, President Obama said: “I will not negotiate over Congress’s responsibility to pay bills it’s already racked up.  I’m not going to allow anybody to drag the good name of the United States of America through the mud just to refight a settled election or extract ideological demands.  Nobody gets to hurt our economy and millions of hardworking families over a law you don’t like.”

Parent Category: ROOT
Category: News

News

Supervisor Mark Ridley-Thomas and South LA community leaders endorses Jim McDonnell for L.A. County Sheriff

Supervisor Mark Ridley-Thomas and South LA community leaders endorses Jim McDonnell for L.A. County Sheriff

July 17, 2014   Los Angeles County Supervisor Mark Ridley-Thomas (District 2) announced his support for Chief Jim McDonnell for LA County Sheriff.   “Chief...

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Community

LAPD Chief Beck urges more negotiations in stalemate

LAPD Chief Beck urges more negotiations in stalemate

July 17, 2014   LAWT Wire Services   Police Chief Charlie Beck attempted to placate rank-and-file officers who last week voted to reject a proposed...

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Sports News

Concussions a greater problem for Black youth

Concussions a greater problem for Black youth

July 10, 2014   By Jazelle Hunt Washington Correspondent   Despite the flurry of news about NFL lawsuits over concussions, the problem affects far...

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Arts & Culture

Tower of Power will be performing at the Verizon Wireless Amphitheatre in Irvine on August 2nd

Tower of Power will be performing at the Verizon Wireless Amphitheatre in Irvine on August 2nd

July 17, 2014   LAWT NEWS SERVICE     Tower’s musical odyssey actually began in 1968 when Emilio Castillo met Stephen “Doc” Kupka in July...

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Market Update

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3 NASDAQ 4,456.02
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