Click to
Win!

Age no opponent for some of NFL’s veteran stars

August 21, 2014

 

Associated Press

  

 

There’s something stunning happening on Michael Vick’s head.

 

You can’t see them from far away, but... Read more...

Stress a key factor in mental health

August 21, 2014

 

By Stacy M. Brown

Special to the NNPA from The Washington Informer

  

Stress wreaks havoc on the mind and body.

 

Until now, it hasn’t been clear... Read more...

Los Angeles schools decriminalize discipline

August 21, 2014

 

By MATT HAMILTON

Associated Press

 

Students caught misbehaving in the nation’s second largest school district will be sent to the principal’s office rather than... Read more...

Aniston, Hamm, Hudson set to Stand Up to Cancer

August 21, 2014

 

Associated Press

 

 

 

Jennifer Aniston, Jon Hamm, Halle Berry, Reese Witherspoon and Kiefer Sutherland want to connect with you about cancer.

 

They... Read more...

Fake deliveryman charged with two home invasions

August 21, 2014

 

City News Service

 

  

A 34-year-old man was charged this week with posing as a deliveryman in two home invasion robberies in Garden Grove this month. Jerry Cleveland... Read more...

June 06, 2013

By Chris Kardish

Associated Press

 

About 140 people have been arrested during the latest weekly demonstration led by the North Carolina chapter of the NAACP against the state's Republican-led General Assembly.

Police estimate that roughly 1,000 people attended a rally late Monday afternoon behind the Legislative Building. Hundreds later entered the building, with those intending to get arrested wearing green wrist bands.

Those arrested were taken away in plastic bindings. They bring the total arrested in the weekly demonstrations to about 300. The rallies have taken place nearly every Monday since April.

Hundreds more waited outside to cheer on those arrested as they were transported to a detention facility.

The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People has spearheaded demonstrations to protest cuts to social programs, changes to voting laws and other issues championed by the GOP.

Parent Category: ROOT
Category: News

June 06, 2013

By TAMI ABDOLLAH  Associated Press

 

An internal review by the Los Angeles Police Department concluded that rogue ex-officer Christopher Dorner was justifiably fired, a lawyer who reviewed the findings told The Associated Press on Tuesday.

Civil rights attorney Connie Rice said the lengthy examination found no basis for allegations of racism and bias that Dorner made in a manifesto vowing revenge on his former colleagues and their families.

Authorities said Dorner killed four people, including two law enforcement officers, during a weeklong rampage in February that involved a massive manhunt and ended with his apparent suicide in a mountain cabin following a gunbattle with police.

The findings, which are expected to be made public this month at a Los Angeles Police Commission meeting, concluded that Dorner had a history of embellishing stories, misperceiving slights and making bogus complaints against his fellow officers, Rice said.

He took more than twice as long as most officers to complete his training, was nearly incomprehensible during the hearing over his firing, and only filed a complaint against his training officer when he learned she gave him a bad performance review, Rice said.

The department said in a statement the review had not been finalized.

"Any comments or conclusions about the contents of the review are premature," it said. "The LAPD will announce the review once finalized."

Police Commission President Andrea Ordin said the report still needed to go to the inspector general for review and then to the Police Commission.

Chief Charlie Beck ordered the review as Dorner was on the run after being accused of killing the daughter of his former union lawyer and her fiance and releasing the manifesto saying he would get even for being unfairly fired because he was black.

Rice, a longtime department watchdog and frequent critic, was allowed to review the findings.

"The firing was justified and his allegations are completely unfounded," said Rice, who spent two weeks reviewing the findings. "This guy needed to go. And the question was, even if he needed to go, did the LAPD get rid of him in a way that was illegitimate? And the answer for me was no."

The roughly 40-page report relied on about 80 documents, including 900 pages of transcripts from the Board of Rights hearing that concluded Dorner lied when he claimed a training officer had brutally kicked a mentally ill man during an arrest. He was fired for making a false report and a Los Angeles Superior Court judge sided with the department during a 2010 appeal.

The internal LAPD review conducted by Gerry Chaleff, the department's special assistant for constitutional policing, also re-examined at least 10 complaints Dorner officially lodged with the department while he was an officer, Rice said.

In his manifesto, Dorner said the LAPD had tarnished his reputation, ruined the former Navy reserve's military career, and destroyed his life.

"He raised all that racism stuff in my mind because he knew he'd get a rise out of them," Rice said. "He did everything he could to hurt the department."

The department is also conducting a review of the overall discipline system and will also review the cases of a handful of former officers who have since formally requested reviews of their firings.

Rice said she spoke with many black officers in the department who said that though the department still had issues with racism, it had changed a great deal over the past decades.

"Just because racism didn't play a leading role in what happened to Dorner doesn't mean the LAPD is now an inter-racial nirvana," Rice said. "It does still have serious problems like every department does and we shouldn't forget that."

Parent Category: ROOT
Category: News

May 30, 2013

By Charlene Muhammad

LAWT Contributing Writer

 

LOS ANGELES-Youth advocates, activists and lawmakers are pushing for a bill that would set clear standards to help limit solitary confinement of youth in all state and county facilities.

Authored by Senator Leland Yee, the bill seeks to establish a legal definition of the tactic widely condemned as torture and overused in California’s juvenile justice systems, according to advocates.

Solitary confinement contributes to recidivism, mental illness and youth suicides, particularly because weak standards and guidelines allow different departments extreme leeway to determine how the measure can be used, expressed Kim McGill of the Youth Justice Coalition.

“The bill’s also important because it says that solitary confinement will only be used when a young person poses an immediate or substantial risk of harm to others, so it can’t be used for punishment,” McGill stated.

Solitary confinement cannot be used because staff need a break from a young person or doesn’t know what to do with mental health issues, she continued.

At press time, SB61 supporters were on a phone drive to help get the bill out of the Senate and on to the California State Assembly, where the process would start all over again.

The next two to three months of work is worth the effort to get SB61 passed because it would clearly define the measure and severely limit how it can be used, McGill stated.

“We would like to eliminate it all together...There are federal guidelines and state guidelines that can be applied in some ways but the ones around solitary confinement are way too loose and way too vague,” she argued.

SB61 would specifically define solitary confinement as the involuntary placement in a room or cell in isolation from persons other than staff and attorneys.

Youth would be held only to address the safety risk and, if law, would require facilities to report on when the special imprisonment was used, including demographics and the length of confinement.

As a government agency, the California Department of Cor­rec­tions and Rehabilitation (CDCR) typically doesn’t take a position on pending legislation and has no position on SB61, a spokesperson informed.

In 2011, a CDCR internal audit found that youth were often locked up in their cells for over 21 hours a day, according to a fact sheet provided by Sen. Yee. 

The document continued, in one 15-week period, there were 249 incidents of solitary confinement, and in one case, a youth received only one hour out of his cell in a 10-day period. In local juvenile facilities, there have been reports of youth locked up in isolation for 23 hours a day.

Tanisha Denard was among them, she told a Senate Public Safety Committee during a recent hearing.

Arrested at school for fighting, Denard said she was put on probation.  A series of truancy tickets for being late landed her in Los Angeles County juvenile hall on a probation violation, according to the youth.

Negative experiences behind bars rendered her distant. She wouldn’t eat. She became unsure and uncomfortable but, instead of trying counsel her, staff just stopped talking to her, the 19-year-old alleged.

“I guess the staff thought I was depressed, so then they put me on lockdown for real - no cell mate, no dayroom time, no hope,” Denard continued.

“It is by far the worst feeling I had ever experienced...From 8 p.m. or 9 p.m. until 6 a.m., you are locked into a single person cell that looks exactly like the box.  It’s also freezing, and if you’re found with an extra blanket or sweatshirt, you are accused of having contraband and punished,” she continued.

Denard further stated she and other youth in solitary confinement had no books or writing materials, so their nights were endless.

“... just you, your thoughts and the screams or crying of the young people in the cells next to you...Your family and the community expect that you are safe and unharmed.   In reality you might be safe from other youth – but not from yourself.  Being locked down makes you feel that you are worthless to society.  You start to think about any way to escape – even if it means suicide,” the young activist elaborated.

She recommends creating a nature park as one alternative to 23-hour cells to help incarcerated youth calm down.  “...or have us work outside to grow food, or take vocational trainings so we are ready to start our lives over after release,” Denard suggested.

Parent Category: ROOT
Category: News

May 30, 2013

LAWT Wire Service

On May 24, 2013, Charles Ramsey was present at an event to meet the public when a statue of him was unveiled. The unveiling took place in Stanville, Kentucky at the Eric C. Conn Law Office. Eric C. Conn was the host of the event and is known for his love of statues.

Conn stated, “I can’t think of a better way to commend my friend Charles than having a statue made in his honor.”

The sculptor decided to depict Ramsey as he was on the day he became a hero.

The sculptor has stated, “The most difficult part of making the statue is sculpting Ramsey’s unique hair style.”

Ramsey was accompanied by two members of what he refers to as “Team Charles.” He had to endure more free burgers as burgers and refreshments were served at the event. The statue, will be donated to a museum in Cleveland, Ohio, which is Ramsey’s hometown.

Parent Category: ROOT
Category: News

News

Obama gives France $10 million to fight terror in Africa

Obama gives France $10 million to fight terror in Africa

August 21, 2014   By Saeed Shabazz   Special to the NNPA from the New York Amsterdam News       Incensed by the news that President Barack...

Read More...

Community

Donating blood saves lives; Sabriya’s Castle of Fun Foundation Annual blood drive is back for the ­community September 27th and sponsored by Ronald McDonald House Charities of Southern California.

Donating blood saves lives; Sabriya’s Castle of Fun Foundation Annual blood drive is back for the ­community September 27th and sponsored by Ronald McDonald House Charities of Southern California.

August 21, 2014   By Brian W. Carter   LAWT Staff Writer       Blood donation is so important and vital to many lives being saved.  It can...

Read More...

Sports News

The dubious Sterling era is officially over – former Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer is in

The dubious Sterling era is officially over – former Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer is in

August 14, 2014   Associated Press   Steve Ballmer officially became the new owner of the Los Angeles Clippers on Tuesday August 12.   The team...

Read More...

Arts & Culture

Ray Jay faces misdemeanor charges

Ray Jay faces misdemeanor charges

August 21, 2014   City News Service       Entertainer Ray J, who was arrested in May for allegedly groping a woman at a Beverly Hills hotel bar...

Read More...

Market Update

1 DOW 17,001.22
-38.27 (-0.22%)    
2 S&P 1,988.40
-3.97 (-0.20%)    
3 NASDAQ 4,538.55
+6.45 (0.14%)