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Clippers sign Doc Rivers to 5-year extension

August 28, 2014

 

Associated Press

  

Doc Rivers is staying with the Los Angeles Clippers for another five years.

 

In Steve Ballmer’s first big move since taking over as... Read more...

Emergency room visits down due to Obamacare

August 28, 2014

 

City News Service

 

The pace of growth in Los Angeles County emergency room visits slowed in the early months of Obamacare, according to state records cited recently. During... Read more...

Celebrities join public TV anti-dropout effort

August 28, 2014

 

Tony Bennett and Edward James Olmos are among the celebrities joining a public media effort to boost school graduation rates.

 

The Corporation for Public Broadcasting and... Read more...

Source: BET suspends producer after Blue Ivy joke

August 28, 2014

 

Associated Press

  

NEW YORK (AP) — BET has suspended a producer after a joke about Beyoncé and Jay Z’s daughter that aired Monday on the network's music video countdown... Read more...

California to appeal ruling tossing death penalty

August 28, 2014

By PAUL ELIAS 

Associated Press

  

California’s attorney general says she will appeal a federal court ruling that called the state’s death penalty unconstitutional.

 

The... Read more...

February 21, 2013

By MICHELLE FAUL  Associated Press

 

Academic and co-founder of South Africa's Black Conscious Movement, Mamphela Ramphele, announced the creation of a new political party Monday "to build the South Africa of our dreams," lambasting the 101-year-old African National Congress of Nelson Mandela for corruption and power abuse.

The 65-year-old medical doctor, who was close to activist Steve Biko before he was assassinated and bore him a son, told a news conference that her party will contest the 2014 elections, campaign "from village to village" and serve millions of South Africans "who have confirmed a hunger for a new beginning."

Her party joins several in the opposition at a time when South Africa is burdened by a growing chasm between rich and poor, as well as massive unemployment, and increasingly violent protests against job losses, utility shortages and an education and health system in crisis. She said Monday that she was appalled to learn that 71 percent of South Africans between the ages of 15 to 38 years are unemployed. That group, she said, makes up 60 percent of the population.

Ramphele, among four people appointed managing directors of The World Bank in 2000, has what South Africans call "struggle credentials." She was an anti-apartheid activist and domestic partner of Black Consciousness co-founder Biko, with whom she had a son. Ramphele spent seven years under house arrest enforced by the white-minority apartheid regime in the 1970s, and she used her expulsion to a remote rural area to start a health program and empower women through initiatives like growing vegetables.

But analysts say they don't know what she will bring to the political table, noting that her criticisms of the ANC are no different from those of several other opposition leaders, that she has no grass-roots support and is not well-known even in cities. The ANC party that fought a guerrilla war to liberate South Africans from apartheid has won resounding victories at past elections.

"The dream has faded for the many living in poverty and destitution in our increasingly unequal society," Ramphele said. "And perhaps worst of all, my generation has to confess to the young people of our country: We have failed you."

Ramphele said her party, called Agang in the Sesotho language meaning "Build," will be funded by South Africans at home and abroad. City Press reported that she had recently been on a fundraising trip abroad where she canvassed South African ambassadors.

She also criticized the government's foreign policy, saying South Africa has lost "moral authority and international respect" for taking positions on Zimbabwe, Sudan's Darfur province and Myanmar that flout the human rights principles of the constitution.

She also attacked the decision to refuse a visa to Tibet's exiled religious leader, the Dalai Lama, as "the surrender of our country's national sovereignty to appease foreign powers such as China."

Recently she has become a businesswoman, sitting on the boards of several companies including Anglo American Corp. and Gold Fields Limited. This makes her part of the small elite that has benefited from black empowerment programs, criticized for promoting ANC members and cronies.

Ramphele has drawn the ire of the ANC-allied National Union of Mineworkers for defending companies that want to lay off workers in the aftermath of violent and prolonged strikes that led to the police killings of at least 34 mine workers last year. She said it was better to lose jobs now and work on creating new high-tech jobs.

On Monday, Ramphele spoke of the need for reform and innovation in the mining sector that is a pillar of the South African economy, and said its reliance on migrant labor and large numbers of cheap, low-skilled workers is unsustainable.

The union had welcomed her resignation from Gold Fields last week, ahead of Monday's announcement. Spokesman Lesiba Seshoka told The Associated Press that in the five years she chaired the company "there has been no transformation, in fact we have seen the state of health and safety get worse."

Gold Fields spokesman Sven Lunsche denied that, saying the mine has had "safety issues" but the number of fatalities has consistently decreased.

Lunsche said Ramphele "has certainly put a focus on sustainable development and drove very hard at board level for everything from housing to investing in communities."

Like most miners in South Africa, many Gold Fields workers live in shacks. The company says on its website that it has reduced room density in its hostels to just over two to a room from six in 2006 in a major housing investment program. Ramphele's interest in the plight of people living in overcrowded hostels led her to start the Western Cape Men's Hostel Dwellers Association in the 1980s.

In 1988 she went to Harvard University as the Carnegie Distinguished International Fellow and wrote a doctorate of philosophy thesis based on her research at hostels. She later wrote a book about life in the migrant labor hostels.

Parent Category: ROOT
Category: News

February 21, 2013

By COREY WILLIAMS | Associated Press

 

The fiscal crisis plaguing Detroit is now in the hands of Michigan’s governor after a state-appointed review team determined the city was in a financial emergency with “no satisfactory plan” to resolve it.

Republican Gov. Rick Snyder has 30 days to decide if Detroit needs an emergency manager to take charge of its finances and spending, and come up with a new plan to get the city out of its financial mess.

After spending weeks looking at the city’s books, the independent review team released a report Tuesday saying Detroit’s deficit could have reached $900 million last fiscal year had it not borrowed enormous amounts of money. The city’s long-term liabilities, including underfunded pensions, are more than $14 billion.

The report also said the city’s bureaucratic structure makes it difficult to solve the financial problems.

Some fiscal experts believe the city's only way out may be municipal bankruptcy, but state Treasurer Andy Dillon said answers could be found if the city and state work together.

“It’s our hope at the state level that this is a partnership. It doesn’t have to be adversarial,” said Dillon, a member of the review team. “A lot of the ingredients for the turnaround of the city are in place. Now we just need to execute. I do believe strongly that Detroit is fixable.”

But over the last nine months, that relationship has been strained. Detroit Mayor Dave Bing and the nine-member City Council entered into a consent agreement with Snyder in April that allowed some state oversight and help with Detroit’s finances — short of cash infusions — in return for certain fiscal reforms. However, the city often missed deadlines and benchmarks.

The ongoing cash crisis has threatened to leave the city, which has a current budget deficit of $327 million, without money to pay its workers or other bills. Dillon said the city has been running deficits since 2005, and masking over them with long-term borrowing.

“I stand with Detroiters and other stakeholders that the pace of change has been frustratingly slow,” said Gary Brown, City Council president pro-tem. “The political will has often not been there to make the necessary and bold fiscal reforms. ... Without a doubt we need the support and accountability that a State of Michigan partnership offers. We cannot address our legacy obligations alone.”

Under state law, Snyder has 30 days following the review team's finding to decide for himself whether there’s a financial emergency. Bing would have 10 days to request a hearing. The first-term governor could then revoke his decision or appoint an emergency manager.

The emergency manager would be responsible for overseeing all of the city's spending. Bing and the City Council would keep their jobs, but the manager would decide all financial matters. And only the manager would have the power to authorize the city to take the bankruptcy route.

James McTevia, president of a Michigan-based firm that specializes in turnaround management, said an emergency manager could halt the city’s borrowing, freeze debt and restructure finances, including voiding contracts.

“The checkbook needs to be taken from the politicians,” he said.

However, others said that even with an emergency manager, municipal bankruptcy may be the city’s only option.

“Is it imminent? Well, not tomorrow,” said Doug Bernstein, managing partner of the Banking, Bankruptcy and Creditors’ Rights Practice Group for Michigan-based Plunkett Cooney law firm. “You need to give a financial manager the opportunity to formulate a plan and let the plan have a chance to succeed or fail. It may not avoid a bankruptcy, but you don’t need to do a bankruptcy today.”

Bing said Tuesday's report shouldn’t have surprised anyone.

“My administration has been saying for the past four years that the city is under financial stress,” Bing said in an emailed statement. “If the governor decides to appoint an emergency financial manager, he or she, like my administration, is going to need resources — particularly in the form of cash and additional staff.”

Snyder spokeswoman Sara Wurfel said the governor will carefully review the team’s report.

“He won’t make a determination immediately, but sooner rather than later,” she said. “The governor believes that a strong and successful Detroit is key to Michigan’s continued comeback.”

If Snyder appoints an emergency manager, Detroit would be the sixth and largest city in Michigan to have one. The cities of Benton Harbor, Ecorse, Pontiac, Flint and Allen Park are currently under state oversight. School districts in Detroit, Highland Park and Muskegon Heights also have managers.

A new state law taking effect in late March gives local governments the chance to choose their own remedy when a review team finds a financial emergency exists. However, Detroit loses those options if an emergency manager is put in place before the new law goes into effect, said Department of Treasury spokesman Terry Stanton.

The six-member review team began looking closely at Detroit’s books in mid-December. Another team had done the same about 12 months earlier, but stopped short of declaring a financial emergency. That team’s findings eventually led to the consent agreement in April.

Parent Category: ROOT
Category: News

February 21, 2013

Bernette Johnson was sworn in Friday February 15 as the first black chief justice of the Louisiana Supreme Court, less than four months after her colleagues resolved a dispute over whether she was entitled to the position.

Johnson took the oath of office during a brief ceremony a day after her predecessor, Catherine “Kitty” Kimball, formally retired. A public ceremony marking her investiture is scheduled for February 28 on the courthouse steps in the French Quarter.

“After serving for 10 years as a district trial judge, and then as an associate justice of the Supreme Court, I feel well-prepared for the tasks ahead as the chief administrative officer of the judicial system of the state,” Johnson said in a statement. “I am ready to serve, and excited about the challenges of this new position.”

Johnson filed a federal lawsuit in July 2012 after her colleagues said they would debate whether she or Justice Jeffrey Victory, who is white, had the seniority that entitled them to succeed Kimball.

U.S. District Judge Susie Morgan ruled in September that Johnson had more seniority, but stopped short of ordering the state’s highest court to name Johnson as Kimball’s successor.

The Louisiana Supreme Court ended the racially tinged power struggle in October, ruling that Johnson’s years of appointed service count when deciding which justice is “oldest in point of service” under the state constitution.

Voters elected Johnson in 1994 to the state appeals court, and she was assigned to the Supreme Court as part of settlement of an earlier lawsuit that claimed the system for electing justices diluted black voting strength and violated the Voting Rights Act of 1965. She served an eighth Supreme Court district centered in New Orleans until the court reverted back to seven districts in 2000, when she was elected to the high court.

Victory joined the court in 1995, a year after Johnson, but said her years of appointed service shouldn’t count.

Johnson, Victory and a third judge who stood to be second-in-line if Victory’s argument prevailed were recused from debating the matter.

 

Parent Category: ROOT
Category: News

February 14, 2013

By Randall Chase and

Katie Zezima Associated Press

 

Jazz musician Donald Byrd, a leading hard-bop trumpeter of the 1950s who collaborated on dozens of albums with top artists of his time and later enjoyed commercial success with hit jazz-funk fusion records such as “Black Byrd,” has died. He was 80.

He died Feb. 4 in Delaware, according to Haley Funeral Directors in the Detroit suburb of Southfield, Mich., which is handling arrangements. It didn’t have details on his death.

Byrd, who was also a pioneer in jazz education, attended Cass Technical High School in Detroit, played in military bands in the Air Force and moved to New York in 1955. The trumpeter, whose given name was Donaldson Toussaint L'Ouverture Byrd II, rose to national prominence when he joined Art Blakey’s Jazz Messengers later that year, filling the seat in the bebop group held by his idol Clifford Brown.

He soon became one of the most in-demand trumpeters on the New York scene, playing with Max Roach, Sonny Rollins, John Coltrane and Thelonious Monk. He also began his recording career by leading sessions for Savoy and other labels.

In 1958, he signed an exclusive recording contract with the Blue Note label and formed a band with a fellow Detroit native, baritone saxophonist Pepper Adams, making their label debut with the 1959 album “Off to the Races.” The band became one of the leading exponents of the hard-bop style, which evolved from bebop and blended in elements of R&B, soul and gospel music. A 1961 recording, “Free Form,” brought attention to a promising young pianist, Herbie Hancock.

In the 1960s, Byrd, who had received his master’s degree from the Manhattan School of Music, turned his attention to jazz education. He studied in Paris with composer Nadia Boulanger, became the first person to teach jazz at Rutgers University in New Jersey, and started the jazz studies department at Howard University in Washington, D.C.

Byrd began moving toward a more commercial sound with the funk-jazz fusion album “Fancy Free” in 1969, taking a path followed by fellow trumpeters Miles Davis and Freddie Hubbard. He teamed up with the Mizell brothers to release “Black Byrd” in 1973, a blend of jazz, R&B and funk that became Blue Note’s highest selling album at the time.

Jazz critics panned Byrd for deviating from the jazz mainstream, but he was unperturbed.

“I’m creative; I’m not re-creative,” Byrd told the Detroit Free Press in a 1999 interview. “I don’t follow what everybody else does.”

Byrd invited several of his best students at Howard to join a jazz-fusion group called the Blackbyrds that reached a mainstream audience with a sound heavy on R&B and rock influences. The band landed in the Top 10 on the R&B charts with the mid-'70s albums “Street Lady,” “Stepping Into Tomorrow” and “Place and Spaces.”

In 1982, Byrd, who also had a law degree, received his doctorate from New York’s Teachers College, Columbia University, and turned his attention from performing to education. Byrd, a longtime resident of Teaneck, N.J., was a distinguished scholar at William Paterson University and twice served as an artist-in-residence at Delaware State University.

Byrd didn’t have much training in mathematics but created a groundbreaking curriculum called Music + Math (equals) Art, in which he transformed notes into numbers to simultaneously teach music and math.

“I can take any series of numbers and turn it into music, from Bach to bebop, Herbie Hancock to hip-hop,” he told The Star-Ledger newspaper of Newark, N.J.

In the late ’80s and early ’90s, he returned to playing hard-bop on several albums for the Landmark label, which also featured saxophonists Kenny Garrett and Joe Henderson.

He performed on Guru’s 1993 jazz-rap album, “Jazzmatazz, Vol. 1,” and his recordings were sampled on more than 100 hip-hop songs by such performers as Black Moon, Nas, Ludacris and A Tribe Called Quest.

In 2000, the National Endowment for the Arts recognized Byrd as a Jazz Master, the nation's highest jazz honor.

Zezima reported from Trenton, N.J. Associated Press writer Charles J. Gans in New York contributed to this report.

Parent Category: ROOT
Category: News

News

Electric vehicle charging stations now available at county facilities for public visitors

Electric vehicle charging stations now available at county facilities for public visitors

August 28, 2014   LAWT News Service   Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors Chairman Don Knabe announced the installation and launch of electric...

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Community

County invites residents to community meetings to discuss community development and housing funds; Five community meetings are scheduled from September 9 through September 23, 2014; Public can also submit written comments through October 23, 2014

County invites residents to community meetings to discuss community development and housing funds; Five community meetings are scheduled from September 9 through September 23, 2014; Public can also submit written comments through October 23, 2014

August 28, 2014   LAWT News Service   The Community Development Commission of the County of Los Angeles (CDC) invites residents to a series of five...

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Sports News

Age no opponent for some of NFL’s veteran stars

Age no opponent for some of NFL’s veteran stars

August 21, 2014   Associated Press      There’s something stunning happening on Michael Vick’s head.   You can’t see them from far away,...

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Arts & Culture

Hip Hop Corner: The Godfather of Hip Hop

Hip Hop Corner: The Godfather of Hip Hop

August 28, 2014   By Jineea Butler  NNPA Columnist      Hip Hop has always had a fetish with gangster movies and characters. We often see artists...

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