September 26, 2013

BY LOLITA C. BALDOR

Associated Press

 

WASHINGTON — The Washington Navy Yard shooter lied about a previous arrest and failed to disclose thousands of dollars in debts when he applied for a security clearance in the Navy.

Then federal investigators dismissed the omissions, and made one of their own — deleting any reference to Aaron Alexis' use of a gun in that arrest.

The gaps in his record eventually allowed him to work in the secure Navy building where he gunned down 12 workers last week, underscoring weaknesses with the clearance process that Navy officials are targeting for change.

Navy Secretary Ray Mabus recommended Monday that all police reports — not just arrests or convictions — involving an individual must be included when a background check is done. He also recommended that the Navy enhance its management of sailor evaluations and fitness reports by assigning more senior officers to oversee them.

The Navy, in a report released Monday, revealed new details about Alexis' Navy service, including his failure to reveal the 2004 arrest over a parking disagreement in Seattle. And officials said the background report given to the Navy omitted the fact that he shot out the tires of another person's car during that dispute.

Instead, the report from the Office of Personnel Management said Alexis "deflated" the tires.

Defense officials have acknowledged that a lot of red flags were missed in Alexis' background, allowing him to maintain a secret-level security clearance and have access to a secure Navy facility despite a string of behavioral problems and brushes with the law. Over the past week, they have been struggling to determine what might have been missed, and what changes could be made in order to try and prevent similar violence in the future.

So far, however, the detailed reviews only underscore how subjective the security checks can be and how difficult it is to predict violent behavior based only on minor conduct issues that could easily be overlooked.

A review of Alexis' nearly four-year Navy career was ordered last week by Mabus.

According to a senior Navy official, the police report included information about the gun and said Alexis was arrested, charged with malicious mischief and fingerprinted and spent the night in jail. But when he appeared in court the charges were dismissed and he believed the incident was erased from his record.

The OPM report, provided to the Navy, left out the gun in its description of the incident, saying Alexis deflated the man's tires in retaliation for the man putting an unknown substance in Alexis' gas tank. It was not clear Monday who was at fault for the omission. Officials said they didn't know whether the summary provided to the Navy was compiled by OPM, or if it was put together by the company that investigated Alexis for his clearance — U.S. Investigations Services, or USIS — and passed on to OPM.

The discrepancy, however, prompted Mabus to recommend changes in the process to Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel. Hagel has ordered two sweeping reviews of military security and employee screening programs, and Mabus' recommendation will be considered as part of those studies.

A senior Navy official said military officials only became aware that a gun was used in the tire incident when they went back through all the records last week, after the Navy Yard shooting. The official was not authorized to discuss the matter publicly by name, so spoke on condition of anonymity.

The tragedy has revealed a number of problems with the security clearance system, including its focus on whether someone is a treason threat rather than a potential killer.

When a check of Alexis' fingerprints disclosed the Seattle police incident, it triggered a follow-up interview for the security clearance. An OPM memo about the interview included multiple questions about debts he failed to pay and problems with collection agencies. In each case, the memo noted that Alexis was having financial troubles, was arranging repayment plans and only he and his mother knew of the debts.

"The subject does not feel that knowledge of any of his financial issues could be used against him for blackmail or coercion," the memo said.

The fact that Alexis did not disclose the debts on his security form was dismissed in the memo, which noted that he answered "no" to the questions because he was working on payment plans and thought the issues would be resolved. He also answered "no" to questions about his police record, including whether he had been arrested, charged, convicted or issued a summons, citation or ticket to appear in court in a criminal proceeding.

The OPM memo said Alexis told the investigator he answered "no" to those questions "because the charge was dismissed and he was told by Connell (his attorney) that the charge would be removed from his record."

The Navy also released other details about Alexis' troubled service record, including two efforts by his commander to impose non-judicial punishments for various infractions.

The Navy said Alexis failed to report to work because he was in jail for a disorderly conduct arrest outside a nightclub in Georgia in September 2008. His commander ordered the loss of a half-month's pay for two months and a one-rank demotion, but suspended both punishments because it was Alexis' first offense.

About a year later, he jumped off some stairs at another nightclub and broke his ankle. His commander demoted him, but Alexis appealed. Another commander later concluded there wasn't enough evidence that Alexis was drunk, so the punishment was dismissed.

He was arrested again a year later, for discharging a firearm in his apartment. Navy officials began preparing a less-than-honorable discharge, but it was never completed because he said the incident was an accident, and no charges were filed. Several months later he received an honorable discharge from the Navy.

While in hindsight, the string of events could have set off alarm bells within the Navy, officials said Monday that it's difficult even now to see them as glaring indicators of last week's shooting rampage.

Parent Category: ROOT
Category: News

September 26, 2013

Associated Press

 

NAIROBI, Kenya (AP) — “Just seeing dead bodies,” Kenya prepared for the gruesome task of recovering dozens more victims than initially feared after its president declared an end Tuesday to the four-day siege of a Nairobi mall by al-Qaida-linked terrorists. Officials said the death count could jump by another 60 or more.

“We have ashamed and defeated our attackers,” President Uhuru Kenyatta said in a televised address to the nation that was delayed for hours as gunbattles persisted at the upscale Westgate mall. “Kenya has stared down evil and triumphed.”

Despite Kenyatta’s declaration, troops remained deployed at the vast complex, and security officials told The Associated Press attackers with weapons or booby traps might still be inside. A plan to remove bodies was aborted because of continued skirmishes inside the mall, where three floors had collapsed.

Describing the victims as “innocent, harmless civilians” of “various nationalities, races, ethnic, cultural, religious and other walks of life,” a solemn-looking Kenyatta reported the known death toll: at least 61 civilians, along with six security forces and five al-Shabab militants.

About 175 people were injured, including 62 who remain hospitalized, he said, acknowledging that “several” bodies remained trapped in the rubble, including those of terrorists.

However, another government official said a far higher toll was feared and morgue workers were preparing to receive up to 60 more bodies. A Western embassy official said the number of additional dead could go as high as 100. Both officials spoke on condition of anonymity in order to discuss information not publicly disclosed.

“They’re just seeing dead bodies. They’ve found no survivors, no live hostages,” said a Nairobi resident whose brother was taking part in the military sweep inside the mall. He spoke to the AP on condition of anonymity because his brother was not authorized to publicly release the information.

Kenyatta said 11 suspects had been arrested; authorities previously announced that seven had been taken into custody at the airport and three elsewhere.

“These cowards will meet justice as will their accomplices and patrons, wherever they are,” an emotional Kenyatta declared.

“We confronted this evil without flinching, contained our deep grief and pain, and conquered it,” he said. “As a nation, our head is bloodied, but unbowed.”

Kenyatta declared three days of national mourning starting Wednesday.

Kenyatta said forensic experts would examine the corpses of the assailants to determine their identities, softening earlier assertions by Kenya’s foreign minister that Americans and a Briton were involved in the siege.

“Intelligence reports had suggested that a British woman and two or three American citizens may have been involved in the attack,” the president said. “We cannot confirm the details at present but forensic experts are working to ascertain the nationalities of the terrorists.”

Kenyan officials as early as Sunday evening began declaring near-victory over what they said were 10 to 15 attackers, some who wore black turbans and many with grenades strapped to their vests. But battles inside the shopping complex continued, straining the credibility of victory declarations.

Booming explosions on Mon­day collapsed a second-story parking garage down into a department store — blasts that lit cars on fire and sent dark plumes of smoke skyward for nearly two hours. Explosions continued throughout Tuesday, and the chatter of gunfire from inside the building could be heard. Fresh smoke rose from the building in the afternoon.

Fears persisted that some of the attackers could still be alive and loose inside the rubble of the mall, a vast complex that had shops for retailers like Bose, Nike and Adidas, as well as banks, restaurants and a casino.

Two Kenyan soldiers who had been inside the mall shortly before the president spoke said the operation was mostly over, but security forces were still combing the facility and had not definitively cleared all the rooms. They spoke on condition of anonymity because they were under orders not to speak to the media.

Another higher-ranking security official involved in the investigations said it would take time to search the whole mall before declaring that the terrorist threat had been crushed. That official also insisted on anonymity.

Al-Shabab, whose name means “The Youth” in Arabic, first began threatening Kenya with a major terror attack in late 2011, after Kenya sent troops into Somalia following a spate of kidnappings of Westerners inside Kenya.

The group used Twitter throughout the four-day siege to say that Somalis have been suffering at the hands of Kenyan military operations in Kenya, and the mall attack was revenge.

“You could have avoided all this and lived your lives with relative safety,” the group Tweeted Tuesday. “Remove your forces from our country and peace will come.”

Al-Shabab, responding to a request from AP, denied that any women had attacked the mall.

“We have an adequate number of young men who fully committed and ready to sacrifice their lives for the sake of Allah and for the sake of their religion,” said the al-Shabab press office in what is thought to be an authentic email address.

The militants specifically targeted non-Muslims, and at least 18 foreigners were among the dead, including six Britons, as well as citizens from France, Canada, the Netherlands, Australia, Peru, India, Ghana, South Africa and China. Five Americans were among the wounded.

The mall attack was the deadliest terrorist attack in Kenya since the 1998 al-Qaida truck bombing of the U.S. Embassy in Nairobi, which killed more than 200 people.

Security officials in Nairobi always knew that Westgate, which was popular with foreign residents of the capital as well as tourists and wealthy Kenyans, was a likely target for terror attacks.

Matt Bryden, a former coordinator of the U.N.’s Somalia monitoring group, said it would have been impossible to adequately protect the complex without transforming its character from a pleasant shopping experience into a U.S. Embassy-like fortress.

“The issue now,” he said, “is how this operation escaped detection. Was it so well-planned and operational security so tight that they managed to beat the system, or was it because there was a serious lapse of intelligence, or was it both?”

“To prevent future attacks the emphasis needs to be figuring it out and fix it, and not turning all shopping malls and restaurants and hotels into embassy-like fortresses.”

A U.S. Embassy vehicle, identifiable by its numbered diplomatic license plate, arrived at the morgue on Tuesday. American officials have not confirmed the deaths of any U.S. citizens, but it appeared possible the morgue visit was by security officials with an agency like the FBI who were seeking information about one of the bodies inside.

Kenyatta said friendly nations offered various forms of assistance. American, British, French and perhaps most importantly Israeli advisers assisted the hostage-rescue mission, though security officials said all military actions were carried out by Kenyans.

Kenyatta singled out President Barack Obama, as well as the leaders of Israel and Britain, for their support.

Associated Press reporters Rodney Muhumuza, Ben Curtis, Adam Schreck and Jacob Kushner in Nairobi, Kenya, Cassandra Vinograd in London, and Abdi Guled in Mogadishu, Somalia, contributed to this report.

Parent Category: ROOT
Category: News

September 19, 2013

By Cierra Duncan

Special to the NNPA from The Houston Defender

 

HOUSTON – Affordable Care Act enrollment goes into effect Oct. 1, and many uninsured Americans will begin comparing new health insurance rates.

President Barack Obama signed the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) into law in March 2010. It makes preventive care and other types of medical care more accessible and affordable to a larger portion of Americans.

Some provisions of the ACA – dubbed “Obamacare” – have already taken effect while others are still in the works, as federal, state and local agencies continue to fine-tune the process. To inform consumers about the ACA, a forum titled “Healthcare in a Changing Landscape” was recently held at the University of Houston, and sponsored by the Children’s Defense Fund, Texas Organizing Project, Get Covered America and the Center for Children, Law & Policy.

Participants included Houston Congresswoman Sheila Jackson Lee, Houston State Rep. Garnet Coleman and Jeness Sherrell, a Change Happens program coordinator. Change Happens is one of eight Texas organizations awarded navigator grants to assist consumers with enrolling in health insurance marketplaces. Coleman worked with the White House on the ACA, and took the lead on behalf of state legislators in favor of the law.

“The Affordable Care Act probably benefits African-Americans more than anyone else,” Coleman said. “We have a high rate of being uninsured, and also have a high rate of illnesses, such as diabetes, heart disease, hypertension and stroke. If people enroll through the exchanges, they will get a health insurance policy that fits their income. Before, people who had pre-existing conditions would have a hard time getting insurance.”

Coleman said the biggest misconception about the ACA is that individuals cannot afford the insurance. “The premiums are actually less for the exchange,” he said. Exchanges are another word for state, federal, or jointly run online marketplaces for health insurance. Navigators, who act as customer service representatives, will assist with finding the appropriate insurance based on need and income.

The exchanges will offer plans that fall into one of four categories: bronze, silver, gold or platinum. Bronze plans have the lowest premiums available, and 60 percent of health care costs will be paid for by the insurer. Under silver plans, insurance companies will cover 70 percent of medical costs.  Gold plans will cover 80 percent of medical costs. Platinum plans will have the highest premiums and cover 90 percent of costs.

Those with limited incomes and those under 30 can purchase a “catastrophic” health plan, which protects from high medical costs. Catastrophic plans include three primary care doctor visits per year and free preventative care at no cost to the insured. However, cost assistance is not available under the plan. Sherrell noted the role of navigators in the process.

“The navigators will have the responsibility of maintaining expertise in eligibility, enrollment, and program specification, as well as conduct public education activities to raise awareness about the exchange,” Sherrell said.

Jackson Lee stressed that under the ACA, insurance companies will no longer be able to deny coverage based on pre-existing medical conditions.  In addition, “No insurance company can prevent you from getting preventive care, such as mammograms and [wellness] exams for men.”

Jackson Lee reminded consumers to beware of scams. Attempts to defraud consumers have already been reported, as scam artists attempt to illegally gain access to personal information such as Social Security numbers, credit cards and bank accounts.

“Please do not send money to anyone if you are looking for information,” she said. “The only money you will pay is to the insurer who has a package that you want.”

For more information on enrollment visit healthcare.gov.

Parent Category: ROOT
Category: News

September 19, 2013

By MICHAEL TARM

Associated Press

 

CHICAGO (AP) — A showy red cape and an autographed Michael Jackson poster drew the most interest from potential buyers as a government auction of around a dozen personal items forfeited by prison-bound ex-congressman Jesse Jackson Jr. got underway Tuesday.

The online auction, which will accept bids over two weeks, is the U.S. Marshals Service way of trying to recoup part of the $750,000 in campaign funds the Chicago Democrat and his wife, Sandra, illegally spent — often to satisfy penchants for attention-grabbing clothes and pop-culture keepsakes.

The red cashmere cape drew the most attention in the hours just after bidding began early Tuesday. By evening, it registered 39 bids — pushing the initial asking price from around $300 to $965. Court documents say Jackson purchased it — with campaign funds — for $1,500 from an Edwards Lowell Furs store.

After a sluggish start, bidding surged during the day for a framed poster dedicated to the 25th anniversary of Michael Jackson’s “Thriller” album — and signed by the pop star himself. By Tuesday evening, there were 45 bids for it,— with the highest bidder willing to part with $1,560 for the pleasure of owning it.

Bids were fewer and farther between for a framed Bruce Lee autograph: It tallied a mere 16 bids by the evening. The highest was for $450.

Calculating existing bids for all the items being auctioned as of Wednesday evening, the feds looked to rake in more than $7,000 from the Jackson auction. Dozens of other frivolities he spent his donors’ money on, including two stuffed elk heads and a football signed by U.S. presidents, aren't part of this auction.

The Jackson items up for auction aren’t the oddest the Marshals Service has sold off to help pay felons’ fines or court-mandated restitution. The underwear of convicted Wall Street fraudster Bernie Madoff was once auctioned by the same Texas-based company contracted to sell the Jackson belongings.

The notoriety surrounding a criminal case can sometimes boost the value of objects that — ironically in the Jacksons’ case — become celebrity memorabilia in their own right, explained Jason Rzepniewski, an auctioneer at the Texas company, Gaston & Sheehan Auctioneers Inc.

Buyers have until Sept. 26 to bid at www.txauction.com for any of the Jacksons’ former possessions that tug at their heartstrings.

As the auction began Tuesday, one option for eager buyers was a guitar supposedly signed by both Eddie Van Halen and Michael Jackson, which prosecutors said the former congressman spent $4,000 in campaign funds to purchase. But hours later, it was scratched from the auction. The U.S. Marshals Service said it was pulled from the auction because of questions about its authenticity.

Jesse Jackson Jr., the 48-year-old son of civil rights leader the Rev. Jesse Jackson and a one-time golden boy of Democratic politics, is now effectively broke thanks to his legal troubles, his lawyers have said.

He also faces prison time.

Within the next several months, Jackson must leave his two school-aged kids and enter a federal facility to begin serving a 2½-year term for to scheming to spend campaign funds on himself and his wife. The same federal judge who sentenced Jackson last month also imposed a yearlong sentence on his wife.

Parent Category: ROOT
Category: News

September 19, 2013

Special to the NNPA from the New York Carib News

 

Executive Director of the US base Drug Policy Alliance, Ethan Nadelmann believes anecdotal evidence suggests it could be the next big crop for the island.

The Portia Simpson Miller led administration is being urged to legalize and regulate marijuana as the nation’s economy could benefit from such a move.

This is according to the Executive Director of the US base Drug Policy Alliance, Ethan Nadelmann who believes that although a study has not been carried out surrounding the benefits of marijuana legalization, anecdotal evidence suggests it could be the next big crop for the island.

“If you legally regulate marijuana, first you stop wasting tens of millions of dollars per year on enforcing a policy, secondly you reduce the opportunities for police corruption, you begin to raise tax revenue from the domestic sales of cannabis and you can begin to recruit tourism on that basis.”

He pointed out that the United States has no credibility in lecturing any country on changing its marijuana legislations because 20 states in the U.S. has legally regulated marijuana and are reaping the benefits from it.

Meanwhile, well-known Jamaican scientist, Dr. Henry Lowe believes the Portia Simpson Miller administration should take a serious look at developing the medical marijuana industry.

Lowe told an editor’s forum at the Jamaica Gleaner on Wednesday that the Government is missing out on billions of dollars, which could be earned from the wide range of cosmeceutical, neutraceutical and pharmaceutical products being developed across the world.

“I think Jamaica has got a clear leadership role in medical ganja, and I am calling on the Government of Jamaica – including the parliamentary Opposition – to take a look at this, so we can move forward and do what we need to do…because it has real potential.”

Lowe argued that while the cultivation of marijuana is illegal and most of the debate has been centered on the smoking of marijuana, emphasis must now shift to the medical and extension, economic potential for Jamaica. 

Parent Category: ROOT
Category: News

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