December 05, 2013

By Everett L. Glenn

NNPA Special Contributor 

 

SECOND OF A 3-PART SERIES

(As a sports agent, Attorney Everett Glenn has negotiated contracts for some of the biggest names in sports, including NFL Hall of Famers Jerry Rice, Richard Dent and Reggie White as well as 11 first round draft picks. He has also had a front-row seat observing how Black athletes and the Black community are exploited, enriching others while leaving the community and, ultimately, the athletes themselves destitute. Sports is a $500 billion per year industry, but few of those dollars return to the African-American community. According to Sports Illustrated, by the time former NFL players have been retired for two years, nearly 80 percent of them “have gone bankrupt or are under financial stress because of joblessness or divorce.” Within five years of retirement, approximately 60 percent of former NBA players are broke. After more than three decades of looking at this tragedy on the collegiate and professional level, Attorney Glenn pulls back the cover on these practices in a 3-part series for the NNPA News Service and, more importantly, outlines what can be done to halt the wholesale exploitation and initiate economic reciprocity.)

WASHINGTON (NNPA) — There have been so many former professional athletes in the news recently who have gone from rags-to-riches-back-to-rags again that they could form their own reality show.

Future Hall of Famer Terrell Owens, for example, accumulated some amazing stats during his 15-year NFL career as a wide receiver: second in league history with 15,934 yards, tied for second with 153 touchdowns and sixth with 1,078 catches.

Instead of talking about his on-field accomplishments, however, fans and sportscasters are talking about his interview with Dr. Phil in which he disclosed that he has lost all of his money, estimated to be between $80 million and $100 million.

After falling behind in child support payments to baby mama Kimberly Floyd, a judge ordered T.O. to complete eight hours of community service, which he performed at a Los Angeles Goodwill store.

And there was former NBA baller Allen Iverson, who says he’s broke after earning more than $150 million during his 15-year NBA career, plus a Reebok endorsement worth $50 million . At his divorce proceedings last year, Iverson shouted to his estranged wife, Tawanna, “I don’t even have money for a cheeseburger.”

Hundreds of other former professional athletes – including former Boston Celtic Antoine Walker, boxer Mike Tyson and track star Marion Jones – could be added to the list. And no matter how often their stories are told, we’re likely to see still more stories of personal and financial ruin.

Let’s be clear: athletes who spend lavishly and regularly travel with as many as 50 freeloaders must accept direct responsibility for their current predicament. But they are not the only ones at fault in a system that routinely separates Black athletes from their community while they are still enrolled in college, steering them away from wives who look like them and White agents who don’t share their culture.

What separates the exploitation of the Black athlete at the professional level, where Black athletes make up roughly 80 percent of the NBA and 70 percent of the NFL, is money. Big, big money. And big money in the hands of unsophisticated Black athletes is a train wreck waiting to happen, attracting agents, financial advisers and other professionals who view them as easy prey.

In the typical scenario, a “qualified” agent lands a client and then quickly recommends a financial adviser. Or, vice versa. Maybe the pair recruits together. Maybe they just vouch for “their guy.” Maybe there are kickbacks. Maybe there is the expectation of future swaps.  However it goes down, in the end, a player thinks he has two sets of independent, trustworthy eyes on his money when, in fact, he has none.

How is it that well-paid agents and advisers are absolved of any responsibility and/or liability for their complicity in players’ financial fatalities? We read about Iverson’s financial problems with no mention of his agent, Leon Rose of CAA. We know about Terrell Owens’ money worries but Drew Rosenhaus, his “super agent,” isn’t held accountable. If you check the websites of major agents, they all in one form or another claim a “family-first” approach. The only family they put first is theirs.

The same media that ignores their colossal failures had no problem demonizing Don King. He single-handedly changed the economics of the fight game with such promotions as the “Rumble in the Jungle” and the “Thrilla in Manila,” yet White-owned corporate media have portrayed King as an unrepentant villain. But they don’t make similar claims about his chief rival, Bob Arum, whom promoter Dana White accused of “sucking the life out of the sport (boxing).”

Because coaches and university boosters, most of whom are White, steer Black athletes to White agents, many Black agents – such as Angelo Wright, Al Irby, Alvin Keels, Kennard McGuire and Tony Paige – don’t get a fair opportunity to represent most Black athletes. My guess is that Black player agents represent less than 15 percent of all NBA and NFL players.

According to Sports Illustrated, by the time former NFL players have been retired for two years, nearly 80 percent of them “have gone bankrupt or are under financial stress because of joblessness or divorce.” Within five years of retirement, approximately 60 percent of former NBA players are broke. By virtue of their numbers, it’s clear that Black agents are not leading a parade of Black athletes into bankruptcy or financial distress nor are they sitting by silently watching their clients commit financial suicide.

The top 15 agents/agencies represent the majority of players, and practically all of the stars and superstars, including the two most amazing meltdowns in recent sports history, Allen Iverson and Antoine Walker, who reportedly lost a combined $320 million.

The top agencies include Athletes First, BDA Sports, Creative Artist Agency (CAA), Excel Sports Management, Lagadere, Landmark Sports, Octagon, Priority Sports & Entertainment, Relativity Sports, Rosenhaus Sports,  and Wasserman Sports Management, who collectively manage more than $10 billion in player contracts.

Can you image what would happen if the tables were reversed?  Suppose Black agents dominated 85 percent of the agent game at a time White players dominated the NBA and NFL and more than 80 percent of NFL players and more than 60 percent of NBA players were going bankrupt. Led by Fox News, there would be a public outcry, the appointment of a special commission and at least one televised congressional inquiry.

The exploitation extends far beyond the playing field and basketball court.

Take the case of the $1.2 billion Levi’s Stadium that is being completed with less than 1 percent of minority participation. It will be the new home of the San Francisco 49ers, which has a roster that is 80 percent Black. Moreover, the stadium, expected to open in August 2014, will be located in Santa Clara County, where Whites make up less than half of the population.

According to Fox News, in 2010, there were 10 NFL teams facing major stadium issues. If people of color received a share of the business constructing or overhauling the football facilities in numbers that approximate their representation in the local population, they could significantly empower their communities. If that practice were expanded to the NBA and Major League Baseball, the sharing of the economic pie more fairly could radically transform urban America.

When it comes to agents, perhaps the professional leagues should adopt uniform standards for agents, including an educational requirement, a clean criminal history and no record of fraud. Today, no legal training is required to negotiate player contracts.  There are no apprenticeship requirements. And there are no widely accepted ethical standards. The NFL Players Association issues this warning about agents: Certification is “neither a recommendation, nor a warranty of the contract advisor’s competence, honesty, skills or qualifications.”

In other words, buyer beware.

(Next week: The Solution)

Parent Category: News
Category: Sports

November 28, 2013

By KEN RITTER

Associated Press

 

LAS VEGAS (AP) — O.J. Simpson faces at least four more years in prison after a judge rejected his bid for a new trial in his Las Vegas armed robbery and kidnapping conviction.

“All grounds in the petition lack merit and, consequently, are denied,” Clark County District Judge Linda Marie Bell said in her ruling Tuesday.

Simpson’s lawyer Patricia Palm said she spoke briefly with the former football star from prison, and said he was disappointed but would appeal to the Nevada Supreme Court. Simpson’s new defense team argued that his original lawyers botched his case.

“We’re confident that when we get to the right court we’ll get relief because he deserves relief, because he didn’t get a fair trial,” Palm told The Associated Press.

Clark County District Attorney Steve Wolfson, whose wife was the judge who presided over the Simpson 2008 trial, called Bell’s ruling the right decision.

“I believe Mr. Simpson received a fair trial and had more than competent counsel,” Wolfson said.

If the 66-year-old Simpson loses his appeal to the state high court, he could take the case to federal courts to argue his constitutional right to effective counsel was violated.

Simpson was found guilty of kidnapping, armed robbery and other charges in what he said was an attempt to retrieve memorabilia and personal items from two sports collectibles dealers in a casino hotel room.

Simpson was sentenced to nine to 33 years in Nevada state prison but was granted parole on some convictions in July, meaning he must serve at least four more years locked up.

Simpson’s conviction came 13 years to the day after the former movie and TV star was acquitted in the Los Angeles “trial of the century” in the stabbing deaths of his ex-wife, Nicole Brown Simpson, and her friend Ronald Goldman. Six years later, a jury in Miami acquitted him of all charges in a Florida road rage case.

Simpson’s legal defense in his Las Vegas trial was headed by Yale Galanter, the Miami-based attorney who represented him in the 2001 road rage case. Attorney Gabriel Grasso served with Galanter as co-counsel in Las Vegas.

Galanter, who testified during Simpson’s five-day habeas corpus hearing in May, said he felt vindicated.

“As O.J.’s lawyer and confidante, it was gut-wrenching for me to have to be in a position to defend my strategy and efforts on his behalf as his lawyer and testify against my client,” Galanter said by telephone. “If I did what their legal team says I did, the first thing O.J. should have said to me was, ‘Hey I’m in jail and it’s because of you. Go screw yourself.’”

Bell's 101-page ruling rejected arguments that Simpson received inadequate legal representation.

“Mr. Simpson’s convictions stem from serious offenses,” she wrote. The judge noted the involvement of six co-conspirators and weeks of advance planning.

“Mr. Simpson specifically asked two of his co-conspirators to bring weapons ... to show the sellers he meant business,” she said. And the two memorabilia dealers were “lured into a small hotel room” where they were surprised by Simpson’s group.

The judge considered a 94-page petition for a new trial.

Simpson’s new legal team — Palm, Ozzie Fumo and Tom Pitaro — said they believed they presented overwhelming evidence that Galanter knew of Simpson’s plan, had conflicted interests that shaped the way he handled the case, and that Simpson didn’t get a fair trial.

They said Galanter failed to hire an investigator or have experts examine crucial evidence, including audio tapes that jurors later said convinced them of Simpson’s guilt.

Simpson’s lawyers sought to show that Galanter advised Simpson it was OK to take back his items and should have stepped aside so he could be called as a witness for Simpson’s defense.

Instead, they said, Galanter advised Simpson not to testify and reached a pretrial agreement with prosecutors not to enter evidence into the trial record of phone calls that raised questions about whether he had knowledge of the heist.

Finally, Simpson’s legal team said that by handling the appeal, Galanter nearly precluded Simpson from ever arguing he had ineffective counsel.

A shackled Simpson spent an entire day in May testifying for the first time in the case. Simpson, noticeably grayer and heavier after five years in prison, said he believes Galanter misled him, including telling him it was OK to retrieve the family photos and memorabilia he thought had been stolen from him after his acquittal in Los Angeles in 1995.

Simpson said Galanter advised him that it was his legal right to retrieve personal items as long as no force was used and no one trespassed.

“It was my stuff,” Simpson said. “I followed what I thought was the law. My lawyer told me I couldn’t break into a guy’s room. I didn’t break into anybody’s room. I didn’t try to muscle the guys.”

During his parole hearing in July, Simpson said he was sorry for his actions and said he had made amends with the two memorabilia dealers.

“I just wish I never went to that room,” Simpson said.

Galanter dramatically contradicted Simpson’s account. He testified he was surprised when Simpson told him that he and several other men were planning a “sting” the next morning.

The attorney denied giving Simpson the go-ahead to try to retrieve the items.

“I said, ‘O.J., you’ve got to call the police,’” Galanter testified.

Galanter disputed the claim that Simpson was never informed about plea bargain discussions with prosecutors that could have resulted in a prison sentence of just a few years.

Galanter also testified that Simpson later confided to him that he knew some of the five men with him the night of the robbery had guns.

Simpson maintains to this day that he never asked anyone to bring guns or saw weapons in the cramped hotel room.

“Mr. Simpson never told me he was going to go to the Palace (Station) hotel with a bunch of thugs, kidnap people and take property by force,” Galanter said. “To insinuate I, as his lawyer, would have blessed it is insane.”

Parent Category: News
Category: Sports

November 28, 2013

RENTON, Wash. (AP) — Seahawks cornerback Walter Thurmond has been suspended by the NFL for the team's next four games for violating the league's substance abuse policy.

Thurmond will be eligible to return to the active roster on Monday, Dec. 23 before the final game of the regular season.

A member of one of the NFL’s best secondaries, Thurmond has one interception and one sack thus far. His pick came in the team’s last game, against Minnesota, and he returned it 29 yards for a touchdown.

Parent Category: News
Category: Sports

November 28, 2013

Associated Press

 

The Timber­wolves’ five starters have logged more minutes than any other starting group in the NBA this year, in part because former No. 2 overall draft pick Derrick Williams couldn’t gain the trust of coach Rick Adelman.

Williams is gone. New Wolves President Flip Saunders traded the former No. 2 overall pick to the Sacramento Kings for Luc Mbah a Moute in a deal that was completed on Tuesday morning.

“Luc is known as one of the premier defensive players in the league with an ability to guard multiple positions,” Saunders said in a statement issued by the team. “He adds a lot of energy, grit and a high basketball IQ to our team. We thank Derrick for his contributions to our organization and wish him well in Sacramento.”

Williams was the highest draft pick in franchise history when the Wolves grabbed him in 2011. But his style of play didn’t mesh with Adelman’s system, and the impasse reached a breaking point early this season. Williams missed one game because of back spasms and did not play in four other games as Adelman elected to go with Robbie Hummel and Dante Cunningham with the second unit instead.

Adelman wanted to see more energy from Williams on both ends of court. But Williams often said that he had difficulty getting into the flow of the game with such sporadic minutes. He bounced between small forward and power forward in two-plus years with the Wolves, averaging 10.1 points and 4.9 rebounds per game.

The Kings are hoping Williams can bring some offensive punch to a team that could use some more of it in the frontcourt alongside DeMarcus Cousins. The Kings have been searching for an answer at power forward after Carl Landry went out with a torn hip flexor in the preseason. They've used Jason Thompson and Patrick Patterson to varying degrees of success and see Williams as a player who may just need a change of scenery to realize his potential.

Williams is more comfortable playing the power forward, which he showed when filling in for the injured Kevin Love last season. But with Love back healthy this year, and Cunningham earning Adelman’s trust as a veteran off the bench, there was little room for the 22-year-old. Williams played less than 15 minutes per game this season, much of it in garbage time during blowouts.

The move will help the Wolves balance their roster a little bit, relieving a glut at power forward while addressing a weakness at small forward. The 6-foot-8 Mbah a Moute played with Love in college at UCLA and brings some toughness and defensive presence that the Wolves are sorely lacking.

With Chase Budinger still not close to playing while he recovers from knee surgery, the Wolves needed another body to help take some of the pressure off of Corey Brewer as the team’s primary perimeter defender.

Adelman has told others in the organization that he likes Mbah a Moute’s game, an important endorsement if the Wolves were going to cut ties with Williams.

Mbah a Moute’s size will help the Wolves better matchup with some of the toughest covers in the West, including Oklahoma City’s Kevin Durant, the Clippers’ Blake Griffin and Dirk Nowitzki from Dallas.

Parent Category: News
Category: Sports

November 28, 2013

By Ken Brooks

LAWT Contributing Writer

 

Narbonne’s football team is tasked with going 2-0 this season versus No. 4 seed Carson which gets a chance at redemption against the Gauchos on its second visit this season. Although the score in Carson’s Marine League game loss was not close, the playoffs is a different season. 

Top seeded Narbonne struggled unimpressively in its second round game against Birmingham.  They did not look like a team that is destined to repeat as City champions.  In fact both it and Carson, unlike the first round, were pushed to the limit and had to earn their respective second round home victories. 

Despite having the home field advantage, can Narbonne afford to give away anything near the 140 penalty yards that it surrendered versus Birmingham?  Perhaps so if Carson again cannot score better than the mere eight points it posted in the last meeting.  It’s going down at the same place, same time.  But the Colts better have a different game plan the second time around.

Parent Category: News
Category: Sports

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