May 31, 2012

By MIKE SCHNEIDER | Associated Press

ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) — New documents released in the case of a Florida A&M drum major who died after being beaten by fellow band members show that being ritually hazed was what it took to be accepted inimages/stories/05-31-2012/nu-famuhazing-scrollzz.jpgto the inner circle of the Marching 100's percussionist section.

The affidavits for arrest warrants released Wednesday by the State Attorney’s Office in Orlando say that it was common knowledge band members were required to go through hazing in order to earn the respect of other percussionists.

Eleven band members have been charged with felony hazing for Robert Champion’s death in November. Two others face misdemeanor charges.

Champion had opposed hazing. But he was also vying to be the band's top leader, and friends say he volunteered to be hazed in order to win respect from others.

Category: News

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