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It’s showtime again for Lakers and Byron Scott; Finally they hire former star from Morningside

July 31, 2014

By Kenneth D. Miller

Assistant Managing Editor

 

The Los Angeles Lakers and former star guard Byron Scott have come full circle after the team agreed to hire the Morningside High... Read more...

Caltech scientists discover neurons that inhibit appetite

July 31, 2014

 

City News Service

  

A Caltech professor has identified neurons in the brains of mice that control their appetite and eating behavior, a development that may provide new targets... Read more...

Empowering Africa’s next generation of leaders

July 31, 2014

 

LAWT News Service

 

President Obama’s recent town hall with 500 of Africa’s most promising young leaders provided an inspiring window into what the future holds for Africa,... Read more...

48th Annual Watts Summer Festival; Two Exciting Free Pre-Events Announced

July 31, 2014

LAWT News Service

 

 The historical Watts Summer Festival (WSF) will celebrate its 48th year on Saturday, Aug. 9, at Ted Watkins Park (next to the tennis courts) from noon until 7:30pm.... Read more...

Hearing into Pinnock beating advocated by Bakewell is held; Assemblymembers Sebastian Ridley-Thomas and Reginald Jones-Sawyer Responds to Marlene Pinnock CHP Freeway Beating

July 31, 2014

By Kenneth D. Miller

Assistant Managing Editor

 

Brotherhood Crusade Chairman, Los Angeles Sentinel and Los Angeles Watts Times Publisher Danny J. Bakewell Sr. demand for an independent... Read more...

May 23, 2013

By Martin Griffith

Associated Press

 

Two men have been arrested in the killing of a teenage boy over an iPad in Las Vegas, police said on May 19.

Jacob Dismont, 18, and Michael Solid, 21, were booked last Saturday into the Clark County jail on charges of open murder, robbery and conspiracy to commit robbery.

According to investigators, Marcos Arenas, 15, was walking down a street with the iPad on Thursday when a passenger got out of a vehicle and tried to steal the device from him.

Dismont is accused of trying to wrest the tablet away and dragging Arenas toward the SUV when the youth wouldn't let go of the device. After Dismont re-entered the vehicle and Solid sped away, the teen was dragged until he fell. The vehicle ran over Arenas and he died at a hospital.

“I think both the public and police department share the same sentiment that this was a senseless act of violence,” police spokesman Bill Cassell told The Associated Press.

The suspects succeeded in making off with the device, officers said, but it was not immediately recovered.

Ivan Arenas said he bought the iPad for his son less than two months ago. The family has never had a lot, the father said, and his son valued everything he had.

“For him to lose his life over an iPad, it’s just not fair,” Ivan Arenas told the Las Vegas Review-Journal. “Never in my life would I imagine that me buying my kid an iPad for his birthday would end up with him getting run over.”

Similar thefts of iPads, IPhones and other Apple devices have become so widespread nationwide that the crime has earned the nickname, “Apple picking,” Cassell said.

“This is a nationwide phenomenon where thieves are targeting individuals who are carrying them,” he said.

Police urge victims of such crimes to always let go of the devices.

According to investigators, Solid has an arrest record of possession of a stolen vehicle, petty larceny, robbery and assault. Dismont does not have any prior adult arrests.

Arenas family spokeswoman Tabitha Guertler said family members are relieved by the arrests and grateful for the quick response by police and the public.

“We are very, very relieved and grateful that these men have been apprehended and can’t hurt anyone else,” she said. “We’re traumatized. Marcos’ loss is something that will be with us forever. He was such an incredible person.”

The oldest of 10 children in the family, the teen was a student at Bonanza High School. The attack occurred in the late afternoon about a half-mile from the school.

Parent Category: ROOT
Category: News

May 23, 2013

Associated Press

 

President Barack Obama pledged urgent government help for Oklahoma Tuesday May 21 in the wake of “one of the most destructive” storms in the nation's history.

“In an instant, neighborhoods were destroyed, dozens of people lost their lives, many more were injured,” Obama said from the White House State Dining Room. “Among the victims were young children trying to take shelter in the safest place they knew — their school.”

The president added that the town of Moore, Okla., “needs to get everything it needs right away.”

The White House said it had no announcement yet of a presidential trip to Oklahoma, only that Obama wants to make sure any travel he makes to the disaster area doesn’t interfere with recovery efforts. Presidential spokesman Jay Carney said Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano would travel to the state Wednesday to make sure state officials are getting the federal assistance they need.

Obama spoke on the disaster following a meeting with his disaster response team, including Napoli­tano and top White House officials. On Monday, he spoke with Okla­homa Gov. Mary Fallin and Republican Rep. Tom Cole, whose home is in the heavily damaged town of Moore, a suburb of Oklahoma City.

The president has also declared a major disaster in Oklahoma, ­ordering federal aid to supplement state and local recovery efforts. Federal Emergency Management Agency Director Craig Fugate was due in Oklahoma later Tuesday to ensure that federal resources are being properly deployed.

Carney said FEMA has enough funds at this time to pay for recovery efforts, but did not rule out an additional request for money from Congress in the future.

The state medical examiner’s office has revised the death toll from the tornado to 24 people, including seven children. Authorities had said initially that as many as 51 people were dead, including 20 children.

Teams are continuing to search the rubble in Moore, 10 miles south of Oklahoma City, after the Monday afternoon’s more than half-mile-wide twister.

The Senate, meanwhile, held a moment of silence Tuesday for the victims of the tornadoes.

Parent Category: ROOT
Category: News

May 23, 2013

By STEPHEN OHLEMACHER and ALAN FRAM | Associated Press

 

WASHINGTON (AP) — The man who led the Internal Revenue Service when it was giving extra scrutiny to tea party and other conservative groups seeking tax-exempt status told Congress on Tuesday that he knew little about what was happening while he was still commissioner.

Douglas Shulman, who vacated his position last November when his five-year term expired, told the Senate Finance Committee he didn't learn all the facts until he read last week's report by a Treasury inspector general confirming the targeting strategy.

In his first public remarks since the story broke, Shulman said: "I agree this is an issue that when someone spotted it, they should have brought it up the chain. And they didn't. I don't know why."

Shulman testified at Congress' second hearing on an episode that has largely consumed Washington since an IRS official acknowledged the targeting and apologized for it in remarks to a legal group on May 10. Shulman and the two officials who testified at Tuesday's three-and-a-half hour session — the outgoing acting commissioner, Steven Miller, and J. Russell George, the Treasury Department inspector general who issued the report — were all sworn in as witnesses, an unusual step for the Finance panel.

Shulman said he first learned about the targeting and about the inspector general's investigation in the spring of 2012, during the presidential election. He said that in a meeting with Miller, he was told that IRS workers were using a list to help decide which groups seeking tax-exempt status should get special attention, that the term "tea party" was on that list and that the problem was being addressed. But he said he didn't know what other words were on that list or the scope and severity of the activity.

Pressed by committee Chairman Max Baucus, D-Mont., on how the improper screening system could have occurred in the first place, Shulman said, "Mr. Chairman, I can't say. I can't say that I know that answer."

Shulman said he took what he thought were the proper steps — making sure the inspector general was looking into the situation. He said he did not tell Treasury officials about the improper activity.

"I don't recall talking to anyone about it," Shulman told the committee. "This is not the kind of information" that, with an inspector general's probe underway, "should leave the IRS."

Asked by Sen. John Cornyn, R-Texas, whether he owed conservative groups an apology, Shulman said, "I'm certainly not personally responsible for creating a list that had inappropriate criteria on it."

That was a reference to a list of words IRS workers looked for in deciding which groups to screen, a list that included the terms including "tea party" and "patriot."

"I very much regret that it happened and that it happened on my watch," Shulman said.

The testimony by Shulman and Miller drew skepticism from lawmakers of both parties, including critical remarks from people who have been unhesitant to say anything negative about the IRS since its activities were revealed nearly two weeks ago. Republicans openly rejected George's assertion that he has no evidence that the decision to target conservative groups was politically motivated.

A lack of political motivation "is almost beyond belief," said Sen. Mike Crapo, R-Idaho.

George's report blamed ineffective management for allowing agents to inappropriately target conservative groups for more than 18 months during the 2010 and 2012 elections. Shulman was appointed by President George W. Bush and served from March 2008 until last November.

At a separate hearing, Treasury Secretary Jacob Lew said the IRS's actions against conservative groups were "unacceptable and inexcusable."

Lew told the Senate Banking Committee that he has directed the agency's incoming acting director, Daniel Werfel, to hold people accountable and to fix any flaws in IRS management to make sure there is no recurrence of the problems.

Lew said he first learned about the inspector general's investigation in March but that he was unaware of the findings until they became public this month. Lew became Treasury secretary in February, and was White House chief of staff before that.

For more than a year, from 2011 through the 2012 election, members of Congress repeatedly asked Shulman about complaints from tea party groups that they were being harassed by the IRS. Shulman's responses, usually relayed by a deputy, did not acknowledge that agents had ever targeted tea party groups for special scrutiny.

At one House hearing on March 22, 2012, Shulman was adamant in his denials, saying, "There's absolutely no targeting."

On Tuesday, Republicans expressed anger that Shulman and Miller didn't reveal the screening of conservative groups to Congress, despite lawmakers' repeated inquiries. Miller learned of the situation in early May 2012.

"Mr. Miller, that's a lie by omission," said Sen. Orrin Hatch of Utah, top Republican on the Finance committee. "There's no question about that in my mind. It's a lie by omission and you kept it from people who have the obligation to oversee this matter."

President Barack Obama has forced Miller to resign, and he is leaving office this week.

Shulman said he didn't later tell lawmakers about the targeting because he didn't have full information about the situation.

"I had a partial set of facts," Shulman said. "Sitting there then, sitting here today, I think I made the right decision" to let George, the inspector general, conduct his audit of the targeting.

Shulman said that when he did finally read about the details of the targeting in the inspector general's report, "I was dismayed and I was saddened."

Hatch and Baucus both criticized the agency and said they would investigate how and why the improper screening occurred.

"I intend to get to the bottom of what happened," Baucus said.

George, the Treasury inspector general, has said he told Shulman on May 30, 2012, that his office was auditing the way applications for tax-exempt status were being handled, in part because of complaints from conservative groups. However, George said he did not reveal the results of his investigation.

The IRS agents were conducting the screening to determine whether the groups were engaged in political activity. Certain tax-exempt groups are allowed to engage in politics, but politics cannot be their primary mission. It is up to the IRS to make the determination, so agents are supposed to look for clues when reviewing applications for tax-exempt status.

In March 2010, agents starting singling out groups with "Tea Party" or "Patriots" on their applications. By August 2010, it was part of the written criteria for identifying groups that required more scrutiny, according to George's report.

Agents did not flag similar progressive or liberal labels, though some liberal groups received additional scrutiny because their applications were singled out for other reasons, the report said.

Meanwhile, a conservative organization that says its tax-exempt status is being unfairly held up by the IRS filed a federal lawsuit in Washington against the agency. True the Vote, a Houston group that watches for voting irregularities, is seeking damages and asking to immediately be granted tax-exempt status.

Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington, a campaign finance watchdog, also sued the IRS on Tuesday, seeking to force it to write new rules clarifying restrictions on political spending by some non-profit groups. The law says some groups qualify for tax-exempt status if they engage "exclusively" in social welfare projects, but IRS regulations allow the status if they are "primarily engaged" in social welfare — giving them leeway for some political activity as well.

Parent Category: ROOT
Category: News

May 23, 2013

LAWT Wire Service

 

“Ranking first in dog bites is a title that no community strives to attain,” according to representatives of the American Veterinary Medical Association. To help reduce the number of dog bites across America, they said, the AVMA is offering Californians concrete ways to help reduce the number of dog bites in their community during National Dog Bite Prevention Week.

As a partner in National Dog Bite Prevention Week, the United States Postal Service released its 2012 U.S. Postal Service Dog Attack City Rankings. Los Angeles ranked as No. 1, San Francisco ranked as No. 4, and Sacramento tied for the rank of No. 8 for attacks of postal workers. According to State Farm Insurance, California ranks No. 1 on the list of states with the most dog-bite related insurance claims.

 “Dogs are wonderful, intelligent and loyal creatures, but they depend on responsible owners to teach them how to behave around people,” said Dr. Douglas G. Aspros, president of the AVMA. “Understanding how dogs behave and how to behave around dogs could save countless people from the serious physical and emotional consequences of a dog bite. The AVMA has a multitude of educational resources and experts available to help individuals and community groups understand how they can help prevent dog bites.”

The AVMA offers information on preventing dog bites on its website, including brochures, a video, The Blue Dog Parent Guide and CD, podcasts and many other materials to teach people of all ages how to prevent dog bites.

Here are some simple tips from the AVMA that could help prevent a dog bite:

·                     Don’t run past a dog. Dogs naturally love to chase and catch things.

·                     Never disturb a dog that is caring for puppies, sleeping or eating.

·                     If a dog approaches to sniff you, stay still. In most cases, the dog will go away when it determines you are not a threat.

·                     If you are threatened by a dog, remain calm. Don’t scream or yell. If you say anything, speak calmly and firmly. Avoid eye contact. Try to stay still until the dog leaves, or back away slowly until the dog is out of sight. Don’t turn and run.

·                     If you fall or are knocked to the ground, curl into a ball with your hands over your head and neck. Protect your face.

Parent Category: ROOT
Category: News

News

Council President Wesson Calls for DWP Report

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July 31, 2014   City News Service    A pair of City Council members introduced a motion July 30 calling for a report from the Department of Water...

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Community

Ronald McDonald House Charities of Southern California Grants $7,500 to Sabriya’s Castle of Fun; Generous Donation Supports “Fun” Initiatives for Youth with Blood Disorders

Ronald McDonald House Charities of Southern California Grants $7,500 to Sabriya’s Castle of Fun; Generous Donation Supports “Fun” Initiatives for Youth with Blood Disorders

July 31, 2014   By Keanna Aubert       It’s something we often take for granted – having the means to comfort and support our children through...

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Sports News

Former professional boxer ordered to stand trial for 1987 murder of ex-manager

Former professional boxer ordered to stand trial for 1987 murder of ex-manager

July 24, 2014   LAWT News Service    Former pro boxer Exum Speight has been ordered to stand trial for the 1987 murder of his ex-manager, the Los...

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Arts & Culture

J Dilla’s legacy preserved in the Smithsonian

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July 31, 2014   By Steve Furay Special to the NNPA to The Michigan Citizen     James “J Dilla” Yancey, the late Detroit music producer whose...

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