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Prophet Walker is more than Assembly Candidate; For those who dream he is their internal hope

April 10, 2014

By Kenneth D. Miller

Assistant Managing Editor

 

I’ve heard the whispers of this young man Prophet Walker for some months now, so much so that I took it upon myself to track... Read more...

Elijah Stewart, Julian Richardson lead Boys City Collision XVI roster; View Park’s Top Gun Mareshah Farmer Heads Girl’s City Team

April 03, 2014

LAWT News Services

 

John Wooden Player of the Year and leading City Player of the Year candidate Elijah Stewart and El Camino Real star Julian Richardson will join forces to lead the... Read more...

L.A. City Councilman wants Jay Z concert stopped

April 03, 2014

City News Service

 

Los Angeles City Councilman Jose Huizar wants his colleagues to put the brakes on rapper Jay-Z’s planned two-day music festival at Grand Park. The Budweiser Made... Read more...

Bakewell TOS Cookbook signing reveals unlimited possibilities; Hailing his initial penmanship as much more than tasteful recipes

April 03, 2014

By Kenneth D. Miller

Assistant Managing Editor

 

For more than four decades the name Danny J. Bakewell Sr. has become synonymous with family, civil rights and the uplifting of... Read more...

September 06, 2012

Associated Press

 

Florida A&M University, still reeling from the hazing-related death of a marching band drum major 10 months ago, suspended its Torque Dance Team on Tuesday September 4 following allegations of an off-campus hazing incident.

 

Interim President Larry Robinson said the university received an anonymous report from a parent Tuesday afternoon about an alleged incident that occurred over the Labor Day weekend.

 

“The University takes very seriously any allegation of hazing and has moved quickly to shut the organization down pending the outcome of an investigation,” Robinson said in a news release. “We have zero tolerance for hazing. It’s deplorable and will not be tolerated. It is unconscionable that a student organization would participate in any hazing activity considering what has transpired in the past year.”

 

The campus police chief, dean of students and director of student activities were all notified of the allegations. Robinson said they’ve launched an investigation, but details about what may have happened weren’t released.

 

According to university records, the dance team had already been inactive since December 2011 because it didn’t have an adviser.

 

FAMU has cracked down on hazing since the death last November of drum major Robert Champion, who died after being beaten by fellow band members during a hazing ritual aboard a bus parked outside an Orlando hotel following a football game. The Marching 100 was later suspended, meaning the band won’t be playing at this season’s football games.

 

Twelve people face felony hazing charges, while two others face misdemeanor counts. They have pleaded not guilty.

 

Also following Champion’s death, FAMU suspended new membership intake for all clubs and organizations and implemented more strict procedures. That recruitment ban is set to be lifted this month.

Parent Category: ROOT
Category: News

September 06, 2012

By JULIE PACE

Associated Press

 

Michelle Obama rarely mentions Mitt Romney by name. But everything she says during this presidential campaign is meant to draw a contrast between her husband and his Republican challenger.

She implies that Romney, who had a privileged upbringing, can’t relate when she tells middle-class voters that President Barack Obama understands their economic struggles because he has struggled too. And she suggests Romney would have other priorities when she says her husband’s empathy will result in a second-term agenda focused squarely on middle-class economic security.

The first lady made her case to millions of Americans on Tuesday September 4, headlining the first night of the Democratic Party’s national convention, where two days later her husband accepted the party's presidential nomination for a second time. Her high-profile appearance underscores her key role in his re-election bid: chief defender of his character and leader in efforts to validate the direction he is taking the country.

“I am going to remind people about the values that drive my husband to do what he has done and what he is going to do for the next four years,” Mrs. Obama said of her speech during an interview with SiriusXM radio host Joe Madison.

The president said he planned to watch his wife’s speech from the White House with the couple's two daughters.

“I’m going to try to not let them see their daddy cry because when Michelle starts talking, I start getting all misty,” Obama said at rally in Norfolk, Va.

Once the reluctant political spouse, Mrs. Obama has embraced that mission to sell her husband anew throughout the summer while raising money for the campaign and speaking at rallies in battleground states.

These days her speeches are peppered with references to the president’s upbringing in Hawaii, where he was raised by a single mother and his grandparents. She talks about the student loans he took out to pay for college and the years it took to pay them back.

When Romney accused Obama of running a “campaign of hate,” the first lady delivered Obama’s strongest counterpoint — without mentioning the Republican candidate.

“We all know who my husband is, don’t we? And we all know what he stands for,” she said, standing alongside the president at a campaign rally in Iowa.

Key to Mrs. Obama’s campaign strategy is maintaining her own personal appeal.

Anita McBride, who served as first lady Laura Bush’s chief of staff, said that means staying away from the vitriol that has permeated the White House campaign.

“There are plenty of attack dogs in this campaign,” McBride said. “She doesn’t need to be one of them.”

In many ways, the first lady’s challenge Tuesday night was more difficult than it was when she spoke at the 2008 Democratic convention. Back then, her mission was to vouch for her husband’s personal qualities. This time around, she also has to persuade voters to stick with him amid high unemployment and sluggish economic growth.

Many Americans didn’t know Mrs. Obama and some viewed her suspiciously before the 2008 convention. Republicans had questioned her patriotism throughout the campaign because she told voters during the primary that “for the first time in my adult lifetime, I’m really proud of my country.”

Her convention speech sought to put those issues to rest. She declared “I love this country” and used personal stories about her marriage to assure voters they had nothing to fear about her and her husband's values.

Since moving into the White House, Mrs. Obama has focused on tackling childhood obesity and assisting military families. She's largely steered clear of her husband's political battles, at least in public.

But behind the scenes, she’s a sounding board for her husband on pressing policy matters. She also has increasingly promoted his health care overhaul after it was upheld by the Supreme Court.

Parent Category: ROOT
Category: News

September 06, 2012

By MATTHEW DALY

Associated Press

 

In an election-year reminder that he ended the war in Iraq, President Barack Obama vowed last Friday to help soldiers, veterans and their families overcome economic and health care struggles as they return to the nation they have served.

Surrounded by a sea of men and women in fatigues, Obama saluted their service, but cautioned that a “tough fight” remains in Afghanistan even as the U.S. works to transfer security control to Afghan forces. He said the troops’ return home now presents different challenges.

“After fighting for America you shouldn’t have to fight for a job in America,” Obama said. “To you and all you serve, we need to be there for you just like you were there for us.”

Obama’s visit to the vast Fort Bliss Army post in El Paso came on the second anniversary of the end of combat operations in Iraq. While officially not a presidential campaign trip, the visit also served clear political aims by highlighting the end of one unpopular war and the wind-down of another and drawing attention to Obama's role as commander in chief.

Obama also visited Fort Bliss on Aug. 31, 2010, the day he announced the end of the U.S. combat role in Iraq.

“You left Iraq with honor, your heads held high,” Obama said. “And today Iraq has a chance to forge its own destiny, and there are no American troops fighting and dying in Iraq.”

Fort Bliss soldiers participated in the Iraqi invasion in 2003 and were among the last to serve in combat roles there. The post endured significant losses during the Iraq war and its troops are now being deployed in Afghanistan.

Before his remarks, Obama held a private roundtable meeting with service members and military families, including “Gold Star” families who lost relatives overseas.

His message to them, Obama said: “Your loved ones live on in the soul of our nation.”

Obama acknowledged that for those who return, “coming home can be its own struggle.” He cited the effects of post-traumatic stress syndrome and traumatic brain injury.

He announced that he had, earlier, signed an executive order directing federal agencies to expand their efforts at addressing the mental health needs of veterans, service members and their families and to increase measures aimed at preventing suicide.

“I know that you join me in saying to everyone who’s ever worn the uniform, if you’re hurting it’s not a sign of weakness to seek help, it’s a sign of strength,” he said. “We are here to help you stay strong — Army strong.”

Among the steps spelled out in the order is an increase in the number of Department of Veterans Affairs’ counselors. It also orders the Pentagon and the Department of Health and Human Services to undertake a mental health study aimed at improving prevention, diagnoses and treatment of post-traumatic stress syndrome and traumatic brain injury.

Obama also renewed a call on Congress to pass measures in Obama’s economic proposals specifically aimed at veterans, including one that provides tax credits to businesses that hire vets.

Veterans are a key voting bloc in the closely fought presidential race.

A Gallup tracking poll in August shows Republican Mitt Romney leads Obama, 55 percent to 38 percent among veterans. Exit polls conducted in 2008 showed voters who had served in the military preferred Republican John McCain over Obama by 10 percentage points.

At their party’s convention in Tampa, Fla., Romney and other Republicans made repeated references to veterans. Romney broke away from the convention to speak to the American Legion in Indianapolis.

Romney has attempted to blame Obama for threatened spending cuts in defense that will kick in if Congress doesn’t come up with a deficit reduction plan by year's end. The sharp reductions in Pentagon spending and in other domestic programs were part of a deal Obama struck with Republican leaders last year and was designed to force Congress to find other means of reducing the deficit.

Obama reiterated his demands for Congress to act.

“Here’s the thing, there’s no reason those cuts should happen because folks in Congress ought to come together and agree on a responsible plan that reduces the deficit and keeps our military strong,” he said.

Romney’s campaign, however, said Obama’s economic policies had made it more difficult for veterans and said more veterans would face unemployment if the defense cuts are enacted.

“As president, Mitt Romney will never play politics with our military’s strength and will enact pro-growth policies to get veterans — and all Americans — back to work,” said Romney campaign spokesman Ryan Williams.

Parent Category: ROOT
Category: News

September 06, 2012

By Jon Gabrell

Associated Press

 

Nigeria’s navy retook an oil tanker on Wednesday September 5, hijacked off the country’s largest city, freeing 23 Indian sailors held hostage by pirates who fled as the navy arrived, a spokesman said.

None of the sailors was hurt in the hijacking of the MT Abu Dhabi Star, which happened off the coast of Lagos, said Pat Adamson, a spokesman for Dubai-based Pioneer Ship Management Services LLC. The Nigerian navy was providing an escort for the vessel Wednesday afternoon to make sure it arrived safely at Lagos’ busy port, Commodore Kabir Aliyu said.

The pirates who took over the vessel fled when they saw the Nigerian naval ship on the horizon, Adamson said. It was unclear whether they stole any of the ship's cargo, though the crew had begun an inspection of the ship, the spokesman said.

The pirates targeted the ship as it was anchored off the coast Tuesday night, Aliyu said. The sailors onboard sent distress signals as the pirates boarded the Singapore-flagged ship, with their last message indicating they had locked themselves inside a panic room on the vessel, Aliyu said.

During the short hijacking, the ship's management received no ransom demands for the crew, Pioneer Ship Management Services said. That's not unusual, as pirates in the region increasingly target oil tankers for their cargos, holding control of the vessels only long enough to offload the fuel before escaping. That’s in contrast to pirates off the Somali coast, who typically hold sailors for months for ransom.

Pirate attacks are on the rise in West Africa’s Gulf of Guinea, which follows the continent's southward curve from Liberia to Gabon. Over the last year and a half, piracy there has escalated from low-level armed robberies to hijackings and cargo thefts. Last year, London-based Lloyd's Market Association — an umbrella group of insurers — listed Nigeria, neighboring Benin and nearby waters in the same risk category as Somalia, where two decades of war and anarchy have allowed piracy to flourish.

Pirates in West Africa have been more willing to use violence in their robberies, as they target the cargo, not the crew for ransom as is the case off Somalia. Experts say many of the pirates come from Nigeria, where corrupt law enforcement allows criminality to thrive.

Analysts believe the recent hijackings of tanker ships may well be the work of a single, sophisticated criminal gang with knowledge of the oil industry and oil tankers. Those involved in the hijackings may have gotten that experience in Nigeria’s southern Niger Delta, where thieves tap pipelines running through the swamps to steal hundreds of thousands of barrels of oil a day.

Parent Category: ROOT
Category: News

News

The battle to educate our children; As the race moves forward the L.A. Watts Times takes a look at the candidates who are running to improve the quality of education for our children today, tomorrow and into the future

The battle to educate our children; As the race moves forward the L.A. Watts Times takes a look at the candidates who are running to improve the quality of education for our children today, tomorrow and into the future

April 10, 2014   By Thandisizwe Chimurenga   Contributing Writer       The words “battle” and “education” seemingly should not go...

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Eloise Greenfield’s lifelong love of words inspires young African-American readers

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Beloved former Jordan High basketball coach Ron Massey dead at 65

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Book Review: ‘The Myth of Race, The Reality of Racism’

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